Bringing Back the Hipstamatic!

Bringing Back the Hipstamatic!

January 17, 2012

For any of you with an iPhone or pretty much any smart phone with a decent camera, you've probably started to replace your old point and shoots with your phone, and not with horrible results either! I upgraded to the world of smart phones several months ago and have found myself completely captivated by the numerous camera apps.  Two popular ones in particular are Hipstamatic and Instagram for iPhone.

These both have great effects and filters, recreating effects from old analog cameras and films that are either discontinued or just not widely used anymore.  Hipstamatic in particular is specifically designed to recreate the effects of the cult camera from decades past, with different "camera" and "film" options within the app to create different effects. Instagram gives you a wide array of filters to apply to your square photos, and I found an interesting diagram in a Photoweekly enewsletter that shows how you can get the same effects with analog cameras and films. (Feel free to check that out here at Photoweeklyonline).  Instagram also makes it easy to upload photos to social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, but you are required to go through these steps for posting your pictures, and images do not automatically save to your phone.  This can become rather annoying when you don't want to publicly share every image you take.  Perhaps there is a way around this part of Instagram, but I have yet to find it.  I'm much more partial to the Hipstamatic app, and generally prefer its effects and how it automatically saves to my phone's Photo folder.  And you don't have to do too much running around to publicly post Hipstamatic images either, the app makes it pretty easy to do that too.

Well, whatever your preference, here are some of my Hipstamatic images.  If you don't already follow my Facebook fan page or twitter, you can stay updated with a lot of my iPhone photos there!









Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Photography Blog

Small Sunny January
Small Sunny January

February 21, 2019

If you talk to anyway wave hunting lately, most everyone is pretty annoyed with this season's swell.  We usually expect big nor'easter storms to roll thru in the winter months, generating big waves and heavy offshore winds.  Last season we were totally spoiled with head to overhead 6-8'+ days regularly occurring once a week.  This season has been a little different, but perhaps that's a good thing to get me more accustomed to swimming in cold conditions.

Read More

Sunset at the Point
Sunset at the Point

February 05, 2019

I haven't been in the water for sunset in a while.  But the opportunity finally presented itself a couple weeks ago.  The sky was clear for once, there was a bump of swell in the water but apparently no one really deemed it worthwhile because the lineup was empty.  Fellow photographer friend Gus Potter grabbed his board instead of a camera, and the two of us hopped in with only half an hour or so before sunset to catch a few with the one other soul already in the water.  

It was a little windy and wonky, and certainly cold, but it was one of my favorite sessions this month.  You just can't beat that dusky light!

Read More

Shorebreak and Blood
Shorebreak and Blood

January 29, 2019

Shorebreak is a specific phenomenon.  When the change in bottom contours is so significant, and the wave action is high enough, these specific beach waves get jacked up and come crashing down right on the shoreline in a big way.  There is obviously the danger -- if the swell is heavy enough -- of getting caught in the impact zone just like any another wave, and having a massive force of water come crashing down on your head.  But perhaps the bigger shorebreak danger is getting sucked over the falls.  These waves are characterized by breaking on the shore, which means next to no water upon impact if you get sucked up and over and the wave slams you into the beach.  Now take all of that, and go swimming with a 7lb water housing.

Read More