Lotuses in Bloom

Lotuses in Bloom

July 24, 2012

Every summer brings a pleasant little surprise to the residents of North Kingstown.  Along Boston Neck Road is a small little pond. I'm not talking about the large pond that runs along Annaquatucket and under the road, but it's neighboring little little pond, about 30 feet or so in diameter.  It is full of Lotus flowers and every summer in the high heat they bloom for a very short period of time.  I'm not sure where they came from or who planted them so long ago, but they've become a highly anticipated summer treat!  This year, they bloomed just about at the beginning of July and already all the blossoms have withered, leaving the seed pods exposed.  For those of us who are lucky enough to drive by this small secret spot every day know exactly when they've come to bloom, and every year more and more visitors can be seen on the side of the road stopping on their way to work or back from the beach to take pictures and catch a glimpse of these magnificent flowers.

Large and radiant, lotus flowers are a sign of purity in many eastern religions. In Buddhism they signify purity of mind, body and soul, rising tall above the murky water to bloom. In the East many parts of the flower are used in cooking and rituals, honored and revered throughout story and art. With a large commanding presence, the flowers in North Kingstown bloom probably about 7 feet tall from root to flower (I'm just estimating here, but at one spot where you can stand on a rock at water level, several flowers are definitely taller than I am).

I captured these wonderful flowers on my digital camera on the way to work in Newport one day, as well as a couple of frames on my Holga (I'll be sure to share once the film is developed!). I was planning a return trip with my large format camera but sadly the blossoms already started to wither. I guess that project will go on the list for next summer!

How I got these shots:  Nikon D700, Nikkor 70-200mm VRII








Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Photography Blog

Small Sunny January
Small Sunny January

February 21, 2019

If you talk to anyway wave hunting lately, most everyone is pretty annoyed with this season's swell.  We usually expect big nor'easter storms to roll thru in the winter months, generating big waves and heavy offshore winds.  Last season we were totally spoiled with head to overhead 6-8'+ days regularly occurring once a week.  This season has been a little different, but perhaps that's a good thing to get me more accustomed to swimming in cold conditions.

Read More

Sunset at the Point
Sunset at the Point

February 05, 2019

I haven't been in the water for sunset in a while.  But the opportunity finally presented itself a couple weeks ago.  The sky was clear for once, there was a bump of swell in the water but apparently no one really deemed it worthwhile because the lineup was empty.  Fellow photographer friend Gus Potter grabbed his board instead of a camera, and the two of us hopped in with only half an hour or so before sunset to catch a few with the one other soul already in the water.  

It was a little windy and wonky, and certainly cold, but it was one of my favorite sessions this month.  You just can't beat that dusky light!

Read More

Shorebreak and Blood
Shorebreak and Blood

January 29, 2019

Shorebreak is a specific phenomenon.  When the change in bottom contours is so significant, and the wave action is high enough, these specific beach waves get jacked up and come crashing down right on the shoreline in a big way.  There is obviously the danger -- if the swell is heavy enough -- of getting caught in the impact zone just like any another wave, and having a massive force of water come crashing down on your head.  But perhaps the bigger shorebreak danger is getting sucked over the falls.  These waves are characterized by breaking on the shore, which means next to no water upon impact if you get sucked up and over and the wave slams you into the beach.  Now take all of that, and go swimming with a 7lb water housing.

Read More