Old Mystic Seaport

September 11, 2012

The highlight of the cruise was definitely Mystic.  We stopped here after Stonington, making the oh so excruciatingly long hour and a half or so trip from Stonington to the Mystic River.  Ok, it was probably the shortest leg of the trip, but the tricky part was making it UP the river to the Old Mystic Seaport, which was hosting us overnight at the Maritime Museum docks.  I guess they only let a certain number of boats through the drawbridges at certain times every hour, so everyone was scrambling to get up the river at the same time.  We made it to the docks with several other early bird WYC boats.

Staying in Mystic was definitely one of my favorite stops!  There was some wind when we first got there so Lyle went windsurfing while I walked around the seaport to check out some attractions.  The photos included below are mostly from that first walk around the seaport.  I decided to walk around with my 50mm Nikkor prime, and I absolutely loved it!  I had bought this lens at the end of last year but never really gave it much thought since I use my 70-200mm so often for sailing and surf photography.  The 50mm was so much lighter than any zoom you might carry around, and the fast 1.8 capabilities coupled the G grade Nikon glass made for some great shallow detail shots.  

When the Maritime Museum closed for the evening, we were still tied up at dock so we really had the run of the place all night!  I took a night time walk after dinner, enjoying the quiet.  It was also nice having full shower facilities only a couple hundred yards from where we were tied up, meaning it was great day to relax, clean up, and enjoy being so close to land vs. on a mooring.

We stayed two days in Mystic, and then it was on to Block Island for the final stop for the WYC 2012 Cruise.  Stay tuned for more photos and reading about the Cruise!











Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Photography Blog

Small Sunny January
Small Sunny January

February 21, 2019

If you talk to anyway wave hunting lately, most everyone is pretty annoyed with this season's swell.  We usually expect big nor'easter storms to roll thru in the winter months, generating big waves and heavy offshore winds.  Last season we were totally spoiled with head to overhead 6-8'+ days regularly occurring once a week.  This season has been a little different, but perhaps that's a good thing to get me more accustomed to swimming in cold conditions.

Read More

Sunset at the Point
Sunset at the Point

February 05, 2019

I haven't been in the water for sunset in a while.  But the opportunity finally presented itself a couple weeks ago.  The sky was clear for once, there was a bump of swell in the water but apparently no one really deemed it worthwhile because the lineup was empty.  Fellow photographer friend Gus Potter grabbed his board instead of a camera, and the two of us hopped in with only half an hour or so before sunset to catch a few with the one other soul already in the water.  

It was a little windy and wonky, and certainly cold, but it was one of my favorite sessions this month.  You just can't beat that dusky light!

Read More

Shorebreak and Blood
Shorebreak and Blood

January 29, 2019

Shorebreak is a specific phenomenon.  When the change in bottom contours is so significant, and the wave action is high enough, these specific beach waves get jacked up and come crashing down right on the shoreline in a big way.  There is obviously the danger -- if the swell is heavy enough -- of getting caught in the impact zone just like any another wave, and having a massive force of water come crashing down on your head.  But perhaps the bigger shorebreak danger is getting sucked over the falls.  These waves are characterized by breaking on the shore, which means next to no water upon impact if you get sucked up and over and the wave slams you into the beach.  Now take all of that, and go swimming with a 7lb water housing.

Read More